Yukon Gold Potatoes Substitute: The 13 Best Alternatives

Yukon Gold potatoes are one of the most popular white potatoes. During my health coach sessions some clients have asked me about alternatives to them for various reasons. Let’s take a look at the best substitutes for Yukon Gold potatoes.

The following is Yukon Gold potato substitutes:

  1. Russet potatoes
  2. Huckleberry Gold potatoes
  3. Red potatoes
  4. Idaho potatoes
  5. Turnips
  6. Daikon
  7. Celeriac
  8. Kohlrabi
  9. Taro
  10. Yams
  11. Cauliflower
  12. Rutabaga
  13. Broccoli

This article will include a side-by-side nutrient comparison. In addition, I’ll examine their tastes, textures and cooking methods for each substitute.

In addition to coaching clients about them, I’ve purchased, researched and used the alternatives in this article prior to, during and sometimes after writing this article.

Yukon Gold Potato Substitutes

Yukon Gold potatoes on Kevin Garce's kitchen counter at home.
Yukon Gold potatoes on my kitchen counter at home

The first four options are potatoes in case you’re looking for a potato substitute. The remaining nine are non potato choices.

1. Russet Potatoes

Russet potatoes have a thicker and tougher skin than Yukon Gold. Some people prefer the tougher skin, especially on baked potatoes, which is one of the reasons russet is a good option to use.

The flesh of a russet can be creamy when cooked making it similar. In addition, their flavors are close enough where it doesn’t make much of a difference.

If you’re making a soup, russet may not be the best option because it doesn’t hold together as well during the cooking process.

Other than those russet potatoes can be used for any of the following:

  • Baked potato
  • Mashed
  • French fries
  • Scalloped
  • Roasted

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Russet Potato, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold Potato, raw (100 g)
Calories 79 74
Protein 2.14 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 18.1 g 17.5 g
Fiber 1.3 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.08 g 0.05 g
Sugar 0.62 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 1 2 3

As you can see in the table above, the macros are almost the same. Therefore, if you’re counting calories or carbohydrates, either one is similar.

I often use russet potatoes at home for Yukon Gold. I’ll use them mostly for baked and mashed but prepare them without the unhealthy additives people add on.

The video below has some potato alternatives for diabetics.

2. Huckleberry Gold Potatoes

The Huckleberry Gold is a purple-skinned potato developed at Montana State University. This cultivar was specifically designed to have a low-glycemic index, making them more suitable for diabetics. See more on the glycemic index down further.

The best part of the Huckleberry Gold is it has almost the same versatility the Yukon Gold has, being great for either baking or boiling. In addition, it can be used for the following:

  • Fries
  • Tots
  • Baked
  • Scalloped
  • Soups
  • Stews
  • Roasting

In addition, they taste buttery and have a rich flavor. Even though their skin is purple, the flesh is a lighter, golden yellow similar to Yukon Gold.

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Huckleberry Gold Potato, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold Potato, raw (100 g)
Calories 74 74
Protein 2.03 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 17.6 g 17.5 g
Fiber 1.4 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.04 g 0.05 g
Sugar 0.68 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 4

The macros between the two are very similar. As I mentioned earlier, this potato is designed to have a lower glycemic index than others. Why is that important?

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a scale measuring how fast a particular food raises the blood sugar in the blood 5. Blood sugar spikes can lead to health complications with the heart, nerves, kidneys and eyes 6

Avoiding blood sugar spikes is an important part of consuming healthy food. This is true for diabetics or anyone worrying about their health 7. For this reason, the glycemic index of food is important.

I don’t find these in the supermarket as often as some of the other varieties. When I do, I take advantage of the opportunity and purchase them even if I wasn’t planning on buying them that day.

Kevin Garce checking the potato section of his local supermarket
Checking the potato section of my local supermarket including red potatoes

3. Red Potatoes

Red potatoes are smaller and rounder similar to Yukon Gold. They have a thinner skin, and the flesh is a creamy white. Also similar, red potatoes are less starchy than other potatoes.

Using red potatoes allows versatility because they are good for potato salad and soups. This is so because they hold their shape good. Red potatoes can also be used for the following:

  • Baking
  • Roasting
  • Mashing
  • French fries
  • Tots
  • Scalloping

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Red Potato, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold Potato, raw (100 g)
Calories 70 74
Protein 1.89 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 15.9 g 17.5 g
Fiber 1.7 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.14 g 0.05 g
Sugar 1.29 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 8

The difference in nutrients with red potatoes are a little more than the other potato substitutes but not large enough to make a considerable difference.

Red potatoes provide a little more fiber, vitamin C, B vitamins and minerals.

Red potatoes on a cutting board
Red potatoes on a cutting board

I love using red potatoes for cutting into bite size pieces and roasting them in a pan with onions and bell peppers.

4. Idaho Potatoes

Idaho potatoes refer to any potato variety grown in Idaho. There are 30 different potatoes grown in Idaho containing the Idaho Name. Two of them are Idaho Yukon Gold and Idaho Russet. Huckleberry Gold is another one grown there.

Idaho’s environment is perfect for growing potatoes which is why they are considered the best. The climate and soil are ideal for growing potatoes, and the russet variety is the most popular grown Idaho potato.

Idaho potatoes have similar flavor and creamy flesh making it a great choice. When I first used Idaho, I hardly noticed any difference.

They both can be used for:

  • Baking
  • Scalloped
  • French fries
  • Tots
  • Roasting
  • Mashed

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Idaho Russet Potato, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold Potato, raw (100 g)
Calories 74 74
Protein 2.03 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 17.6 g 17.5 g
Fiber 1.4 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.05 g 0.05 g
Sugar 0.62 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 9 10

An Idaho Russet has almost identical nutrients, another reason they make this list.

5. Turnips

Turnips are sweeter than the starchier potatoes. When turnips are cooked, their consistency becomes more similar to potatoes.

You can use a turnip to do almost anything a cooked Yukon Gold potato can do including the following:

  • Bake
  • Fry
  • Mash
  • Blend them into soups
  • Tots
  • Fries 

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Turnips, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 28 74
Protein 0.90 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 6.4 g 17.5 g
Fiber 1.8 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.10 g 0.05 g
Sugar 3.80 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 11

If you’re counting calories or on a Keto type diet, turnips make a great option due to their fewer carbs and calories.

mashed turnips
Mashed Turnips

6. Daikon

Daikon is very popular in Asia. It’s a radish typically eaten raw or pickled.

When it’s raw, it tastes like a radish but when it’s boiled or baked, it tastes more like potatoes. This makes it good to use and they can be used for the following:

  • Mash
  • Scalloped
  • Potato salad

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Daikon, cooked (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 38 74
Protein 0.67 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 3.3 g 17.5 g
Fiber 1.5 g 1.4 g
Fat 2.63 g 0.05 g
Sugar 1.80 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 12

Daikon radishes are a good option especially if you’re on a keto diet or counting calories. They only contain 1.8 net carbs and about half the number of calories. I easily find them in the supermarket shown in the picture below.

Kevin garce checking daikon radishes in his local supermarket produce section
Checking daikon radishes in my local supermarkets produce section

7. Celeriac (celery root)

Celeriac is actually the root of celery. Unpeeled it doesn’t resemble a potato at all. Once peeled, it looks similar to one.

Celeriac is a good choice because it can be roasted, baked, mashed or used in soups.

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Celeriac, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 42 74
Protein 1.50 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 9.2 g 17.5 g
Fiber 1.8 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.30 g 0.05 g
Sugar 1.60 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 13

Celery root is good to use especially if you’re on a keto diet or counting calories. They only contain 9.2 carbs and almost half the number of calories.

celery root or celeriac
Celeriac Celery root

8. Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is a bulb-like root which can be eaten raw. Although you’re going to want to cook it like a potato.

It tastes similar to a broccoli stem but better. Kohlrabi can be cooked using the following methods:

  • Roast
  • Mash
  • Fries
  • Tots
  • Bake

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Kohlrabi, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 27 74
Protein 1.70 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 6.2 g 17.5 g
Fiber 3.6 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.10 g 0.05 g
Sugar 2.60 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 14

Kohlrabi is another good option especially if you’re counting calories or carbohydrates. It contains less than half the number of each.

kohlrabi
Kohlrabi

9. Taro

Taro is a starchy root vegetable with a rough, bark-like outer skin. The flesh is creamy white or purple.

Taro is slightly sweet and nuttier. It has a pasty consistency and can be mashed.

Some people call it a taro mash and in Hawaii it’s used to make poi. It can also be used for:

  • Baked
  • Mashed
  • Fried
  • Roasted
  • Steamed

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Taro, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 112 74
Protein 1.50 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 26.5 g 17.5 g
Fiber 4.1 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.20 g 0.05 g
Sugar 0.40 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 15

Taro contains a significant amount more of calories and carbohydrates. Therefore, if you’re counting calories or carbs, it’s not the best choice. I easily find them in my local supermarket shown in the picture below.

Kevin Garce's photo of taro in his local supermarket.
Taking a photo of taro in my local supermarket

10. Yams

Yams sometimes get confused with sweet potatoes. This confusion is due to some manufacturers labeling their sweet potatoes as yams, especially the canned version.

They are more like yuca and have a bark-like skin containing some hairs. The flesh is a lighter color.

They taste sweeter and nuttier but still make a good alternative. They can be used for cooking in the following methods:

  • Bake
  • Mash
  • Fry
  • Roast

In Africa, people often mash yams and add them to soups.

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Yams, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 118 74
Protein 1.53 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 27.9 g 17.5 g
Fiber 4.1 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.17 g 0.05 g
Sugar 0.50 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 16

If you’re counting carbs or calories, yams aren’t the best choice because they contain substantially more of each.

Yams provide a little less protein but three times more fiber.

Find out if these are any different than the ones listed here in my article, Russet Potato Substitutes: 13 Healthy Alternatives.

yams
Yukon Gold Potato Substitute Yams

11. Cauliflower

A popular way to use cauliflower is to mash them. Mashed cauliflower surprisingly tastes smooth, light and buttery. I’ve frequently made mashed cauliflower as they make a great option for many items.

In addition, they can be used for the following:

  • Roasting
  • Baking
  • Frying

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Cauliflower, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 25 74
Protein 1.92 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 4.9 g 17.5 g
Fiber 2.0 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.28 g 0.05 g
Sugar 1.91 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 17

Cauliflower is an excellent choice especially if you’re counting calories or looking for a low-carb substitute.

Rutabaga is a good option. Find out the other 12 in my article, Low Carb Potato Substitutes: The 13 Best Alternatives.

12. Rutabaga

Many people describe rutabaga as a mix between turnips and cabbage. They are sweeter than potatoes and less starchy. The texture is similar to sweet potatoes but less sweet and the color is lighter.

Rutabaga can be used any way a Yukon Gold Potato can be used including:

  • Bake
  • Mash
  • Casseroles
  • Stews
  • Soups
  • Roast

In addition, they can be made into fries or tots. For most Thanksgivings, I boil and mash them in addition to potatoes and sweet potatoes.

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Rutabaga, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 37 74
Protein 1.08 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 8.6 g 17.5 g
Fiber 2.3 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.16 g 0.05 g
Sugar 4.46 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 18

They’re a good Keto friendly choice because they have fewer carbohydrates and more fiber. If you’re counting calories, rutabaga contains approximately half the calories.

Many low-carb options for sweet potatoes are different due to flavor. Check those out in my article, Keto Substitute for Sweet Potatoes: 8 Healthy Substitutes.

rutabaga
Rutabaga

13. Broccoli

Broccoli is a good option from this list. A side benefit to mashed broccoli is picky kids like mashed broccoli more than eating it in its natural form. Broccoli can be:

  • Steamed
  • Roasted
  • Mashed

Some people will use broccoli as a compliment to roasted potatoes. Removing half the potatoes and replacing them with broccoli lower the calories and carbohydrates of the side dish.

Let’s examine the nutrients between the two:

Broccoli, raw (100 g) Yukon Gold, raw (100 g)
Calories 32 74
Protein 2.57 g 2.03 g
Carbohydrates 6.2 g 17.5 g
Fiber 2.4 g 1.4 g
Fat 0.34 g 0.05 g
Sugar 1.40 g 0.68 g

Nutrient Resources 19

Broccoli contains fewer carbs and calories while providing more protein and fiber. Many of my health coaching clients use mashed broccoli as a way for their kids to eat broccoli.

mashed broccoli
Mashed broccoli

To conduct some original research and get the opinions of real people, I polled my readers, clients and members of some food groups. I asked them what was the best Yukon Gold Substitute?

  • 65% said the best one was Idaho potatoes.

If you have any questions about this article don’t hesitate to email us. You can find an email on our contact page.

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Article Resources: Foods For Anti-Aging follows strict guidelines to ensure our content is the highest journalistic standard. It's our mission to provide the reader with accurate, honest and unbiased guidance. Our content relies on medical associations, research institutions, government agencies and study resources. Learn more by reading our editorial policy.
  1. USDA: Potatoes, russet, flesh and skin, raw[]
  2. USDA: Yukon Gold Potatoes, Yukon Gold[]
  3. USDA: Brookshire’s, Yukon Gold Potatoes[]
  4. USDA: Purple & Yellow Potatoes[]
  5. Harvard Health Publishing: Glycemic index for 60+ foods[]
  6. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them to Manage Your Diabetes[]
  7. The University of Sydney: Your GI Shopping Guide[]
  8. USDA: Potatoes, red, flesh and skin, raw[]
  9. USDA: Idaho Russet Potatoes[]
  10. The Idaho Potato Commission: Idaho Potato Nutrition Facts[]
  11. USDA: Turnips, raw[]
  12. USDA: Daikon radish, cooked[]
  13. USDA: Celeriac, raw[]
  14. USDA: Kohlrabi, raw[]
  15. USDA: Taro, raw[]
  16. USDA: Yam, raw[]
  17. USDA: Cauliflower, raw[]
  18. USDA: Rutabagas, raw[]
  19. USDA: Broccoli, raw[]

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